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Jazz musicians silenced by coronavirus (updated)

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Here's a listing of jazz-related deaths from the novel coronavirus (COVID-19), updated as we receive them. Our profound sympathies to their families, friends and fans as we remember the musical legacies they have given us.

Argentina-born jazz saxophonist Marcelo Peralta, died in Madrid on March 10. He was 59. Peralta moved to Spain in 1996.

Congolese singer Arlus Mabele, the king of soukous, an Afro-Caribbean dance rhythm similar to the rhumba, died March 19 in Paris. He was 66.

New York City-based pianist and composer Mike Longo died on March 21, two days after his 81st birthday.

Camaroon-born Afro-jazz saxophonist, arranger, conductor and former jazz club operator (Leopoldville, Belgian Congo's Tam-Tam) Manu Dibango. He died March 24 in Paris. He was 86. He worked extensively in France and Belgium.

Swedish trombonist Olle Holmquist died March 25. He was 83.

Denver jazz saxophonist Freddy Rodriguez Sr. died March 25. He was 89.

Los Angeles-based saxophonist and big-band leader Pat Longo died on March 26. He was 90.

Jazz, blues, gospel and rock guitarist Wayman Henry, 66, died March 27. He lived in Mobile, Alabama.

Trumpeter Wallace Roney, bandleader and Miles Davis protege, died March 31. He was 59.

Bassist Alex Layne, a longtime fixture on the NYC jazz scene, died March 31. He was 80.

Pianist, composer, educator and NEA Jazz Master Ellis Marsalis, patriarch of the Marsalis family of jazz musicians, died April 1. He was 85.

Clarinetist and French Quarter Festival board member Alex Lewis died April 1 in New Orleans. He was 75.

Guitarist Bucky Pizzarelli, the father of singer-guitarist John Pizzarelli and bassist Martin Pizzarelli, died April 1 in New Jersey. He was 94.

Drummer Lysa (Lee-sa) Dawn Robinson, who played both jazz and rock, died April 2 at Lankenau Medical Center near Philadelphia. She was 55. Among others, she played with Pink and Billy Paul, as well as Philly jazz guitarist Monnette Sudler.

Music producer Hal Willner died on April 7, one day after his 64th birthday. He was a long-time music producer for “Saturday Night Live,” music coordinator for the Jools Holland and David Sanborn-hosted “Night Music” TV series, which ran from 1988-90, and produced a wide range of recordings and tribute compilations, including jazz.

Banjo player, singer and composer Eddy Davis, leader of Woody Allen’s jazz band since the 1980s, died April 7. He was 79.

Alto saxophonist Lee Konitz died April 15 in New York City. He was 92. His career, which began in the mid-1940s, coursed through bebop, cool jazz and avant-garde jazz.

Bassist, violinist and poet Henry Grimes died April 15 in New York. He was 84. He returned to the jazz scene in 2004 after a 35-year absence during which he was living in obscurity in Los Angeles.

Saxophonist Giuseppi Logan died April 17 in New York. He was 84. He returned to New York's free-jazz jazz scene in 2009 after an absence of nearly 40 years.

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This story appears courtesy of Ken Franckling's Jazz Notes.
Copyright © 2021. All rights reserved.

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