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Jazz At Princeton University Announces Dynamic 2018-2019 Season November 14, 2018 – May 11, 2019

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Guest artists include Blue Note Records trumpeter Ambrose Akinmusire, legendary vocalist Nnenna Freelon, Grammy winner and drummer Terri Lyne Carrington
Jazz at Princeton University, helmed by acclaimed saxophonist/composer Rudresh Mahanthappa, presents a dynamic and compelling 2018-2019 Season, November 14, 2018 – May 11, 2019. Highlights include performances by student groups joined by guest artists including Blue Note Records trumpeter Ambrose Akinmusire, legendary vocalist Nnenna Freelon, and Grammy winner and drummer Terri Lyne Carrington. In April, Jazz at Princeton will present Princeton University’s first-ever outdoor Jazz Festival.

“This year’s Jazz at Princeton program is going to be extraordinary,” says Mahanthappa. “With the contribution of so many of jazz's most articulate voices – both as guest artists and ensemble leaders – we are thrilled to offer performances that will engage, inspire and entertain students, educators and the community at large. I am also excited that we’ll be hosting our first outdoor jazz festival.”

Jazz at Princeton’s six major student ensembles include the Creative Large Ensemble directed by Darcy James Argue, Small Groups I and A directed by Mahanthappa, Small Group X directed by Matthew Parrish, the Jazz Vocal Collective directed by Dr. Trineice Robinson-Martin, and the Vocal Improvisation Ensemble directed by Jay Clayton.

2018-2019 Season

Wednesday, November 14, 2018 – Jazz Vocal Collective
The Jazz Vocal Collective, Jazz at Princeton’s elite vocal jazz ensemble directed by Trineice Robinson-Martin, performs original arrangements of classic and contemporary jazz compositions.

7:30 pm, Taplin Auditorium in Fine Hall. Free and open to the public. Information at visit music.princeton.edu.

Internationally recognized as one of the leading pedagogues in gospel and soul voice training and vocal technique, Dr. Trineice Robinson-Martin is a force within the academic, religious, and performance communities. Her pioneering scholarship on gospel vocal techniques and performance practices can be found in Journal of Singing, Teaching in the 21st Century ed. by Harrison and O’Brian; and So You Want to Sing Gospel and Voice Training for the Gospel Soloist. Creator of Soul Ingredients, Dr. Trineice holds doctoral and master’s degrees from Teachers College Columbia University in music education with an emphasis in contemporary commercial music vocal pedagogy, and a master’s degree in Jazz Studies from Indiana University-Bloomington. Her performance experience spans a variety of musical styles, venues and settings: the intimacy of private parties and local clubs, the grand stages of musical arts centers and large music festivals, and international stages. Dr. Trineice Robinson-Martin is the Executive Director of the African American Jazz Caucus, Inc.; serves on the national faculty of Gospel Music Workshop of America, Inc.; and is a certified instructor in Somatic VoiceworkTM the LoVetri Method.

Saturday, November 17, 2018 – Jazz at Princeton University Small Group I with trumpeter Ambrose Akinmusire
The acclaimed trumpeter joins Princeton’s Small Group I directed by Rudresh Mahanthappa for an exciting collaborative evening of music that includes a commissioned suite in commemoration of the 150th anniversary of W.E.B. Du Bois’ birth.

8:00 pm, Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall. For information and tickets call 609-258-9220 or visit music.princeton.edu.

Ambrose Akinmusire, “a thrilling young trumpeter and astute bandleader [with a] unique spark in his playing” (The New Yorker), was born and raised in Oakland California. He was a member of the Berkeley High School Jazz Ensemble when he caught the attention of saxophonist Steve Coleman, who invited him on a European tour when he was just a 19-year-old student at the Manhattan School of Music. After returning to the West Coast to pursue a master’s degree at the University of Southern California, Akinmusire went on to attend the Thelonious Monk Institute of Jazz in Los Angeles, where he studied with Herbie Hancock, Wayne Shorter, and Terence Blanchard. In 2007 he won the prestigious Thelonious Monk International Jazz Competition and the Carmine Caruso International Jazz Trumpet Solo Competition. He also released his debut album, moved back to New York, and began performing with artists including Vijay Iyer, Aaron Parks, Esperanza Spalding, and Jason Moran. Akinmusire’s highly acclaimed Blue Note debut When the Heart Emerges Glistening was released in 2011. His second Blue Note release is the Imagined savior is far easier to paint.

Friday, November 30, 2018 – Creative Large Ensemble
Jazz at Princeton University’s Creative Large Ensemble, led by Darcy James Argue, continues to redefine the big band in a program encompassing a broad spectrum of the genre.

8 pm at Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall. For information and tickets call 609-258-9220 or visit music.princeton.edu.

Monday, December 3, 2018 – Jazz Vocal Improvisation Ensemble
VIE directed by the world-renowned Jay Clayton presents its first public performance of the year.

7:30 pm, Taplin Auditorium in Fine Hall. Free and open to the public. For information visit music.princeton.edu.

About Jay Clayton

Jay Clayton is an internationally acclaimed vocalist, composer, and educator whose work boldly spans the terrain between jazz and new music. She has gained worldwide attention as both performer and teacher. With more than 40 recordings to her credit, Clayton has appeared alongside such formidable artists as Muhal Richard Abrams, Steve Reich, Kirk Nurock, Julian Priester, Jerry Granelli, Jane Ira Bloom, Gary Bartz, Jack Wilkins, George Cables, Fred Hersch, Gary Thomas, and tap dancer Brenda Bufalino, as well as fellow vocalists Jeanne Lee, Norma Winstone, Urszula Dudziak, and Bobby McFerrin, She has taught extensively throughout the world at schools including Cornish College of the Arts and Peabody Institute in Baltimore. Her book “Sing Your Story: A Practical Guide for Learning and Teaching the Art of Jazz Singing,” was published by Advance Music.

Wednesday, December 5, 2018 – Small Groups I & A
Jazz at Princeton University’s small groups, directed by award-winning saxophonist and program director Rudresh Mahanthappa, present an energizing and beautiful evening of music.

7:30 pm, Taplin Auditorium in Fine Hall. Free and open to the public. For information visit music.princeton.edu.

Thursday, January 10, 2019 – Small Group X
Princeton University’s Small Group X performs under the direction of master bassist Matthew Parrish. The ensemble evokes the small group tradition of Art Blakey groups of the 1950s and 1960s where improvisation and inspiring interaction are key. The group performs as a sextet with several featured trio performances.

7:30 pm at Lee Rehearsal Room, Lewis Arts Complex. Free and open to the public. For information visit music.princeton.edu.

About Matthew Parrish

Born in central California to hard-working, music-loving parents of four children, Matthew Parrish epitomizes the heart of jazz bass performance and livelihood. Matthew has performed and recorded with many of the top names in jazz, Regina Carter, Wynton Marsalis, Dee Dee Bridgewater, Paquito D’Rivera, Houston Person, Clark Terry, Etta Jones, Miri Ben-Ari, James Williams, Harry Sweets Edison, James Newton, Gary Thomas, Greg Osby, Stefon Harris, and Orrin Evans to name a few. His beautiful, warm, and complex sound has earned him an impressive reputation in the music community as a performer and composer/arranger/producer. He has recorded over 50 works, including his debut CD Circles (2000) and his recent recordings with Karine Aguiar, as well as a recording with Houston Person entitled Rain or Shine on Highnote Records.

Saturday, February 16, 2019 – Jazz Vocal Collective with Nnenna Freelon
The world-renowned jazz singer, composer, producer, arranger, and six-time Grammy nominee shares the stage with Princeton’s Jazz Vocal Collective, the university’s elite vocal jazz student ensemble.

8 pm at Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall. For information and tickets call 609-258-9220 or visit at music.princeton.edu.

About Nnenna Freelon

Six-time Grammy nominee Nnenna Freelon has earned a well-deserved reputation as a compelling and captivating live performer. In 2014 she starred in the critically acclaimed show “Georgia on My Mind: Celebrating the Music of Ray Charles” in Las Vegas. Freelon toured with Charles, as well as other great artists including Ellis Marsalis, Al Jarreau, and George Benson. She is the writer, composer, and producer of the original theatrical presentation of “The Clothesline Muse,” a devised theatrical work of dance, music, spoken word, vibrant art and projections. It premiered in Philadelphia in 2013 with a national tour following in 2015. Freelon has always had a passion for education, and in November 2011 was asked by The White House to headline the Asia Pacific Economic Summit for 300 Presidents, Premiers, and Heads of State from around the world. Freelon performed in Laura Karpman’s undertaking of Langston Hughes’ “Ask Your Mama” at the Apollo Theater and at a Hollywood Bowl concert with Jessye Norman and The Roots. She has also performed at the Tanglewood Jazz Festival, on In Performance at the White House, and had a featured song in the hit TV show “Mad Men.” Awards include the Billie Holiday Award from Academie du Jazz, Eubie Blake Award from NYC’s Cultural Crossroads Center, and two nominations for Lady of Soul by Soul Train Awards.

Saturday, April 13, 2019
Princeton University’s first-ever outdoor Jazz Festival. More details coming soon.

Monday, April 15, 2019 – Jazz Vocal Collective
Jazz at Princeton University’s elite vocal jazz ensemble, directed by Dr. Trineice Robinson-Martin, showcase their original arrangements of classic and contemporary jazz compositions.

7:30 pm at Taplin Auditorium in Fine Hall. Free and open to the public. For information visit music.princeton.edu.

Wednesday, April 24, 2019 – Small Groups I & A
Jazz at Princeton University’s small groups, directed by award-winning saxophonist and program director Rudresh Mahanthappa, present an energizing and beautiful evening of music.

7:30 pm, Taplin Auditorium in Fine Hall. Free and open to the public. For information visit music.princeton.edu.

Thursday, April 25, 2019 – Jazz Vocal Improvisation Ensemble
VIE directed by the world-renowned Jay Clayton presents its final performance of the year.

7:30 pm, Taplin Auditorium in Fine Hall. Free and open to the public. For information visit music.princeton.edu.

Monday, April 29, 2019 –Small Group X
Princeton University’s Small Group X performs under the direction of master bassist Matthew Parrish. The ensemble evokes the small group tradition of Art Blakey groups of the 1950s and 1960s where improvisation and inspiring interaction are key. The group performs as a sextet with several featured trio performances.

7:30 pm at Taplin Auditorium in Fine Hall. Free and open to the public. For information visit music.princeton.edu.

Saturday, May 11, 2019 – Creative Large Ensemble with Terri Lyne Carrington
Jazz at Princeton University’s season closes with renowned drummer and Grammy winner Carrington in a rare performance of Jim McNeely’s Tribute to Tony Williams Lifetime alongside students in the Creative Large ensemble led by Darcy James Argue.

8 pm at Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall. For information and tickets call 609-258-9220 or visit music.princeton.edu.

About Terri Lyne Carrington

Grammy Award-winning drummer, producer, and educator Terri Lyne Carrington started her professional career at 10 years old, being the youngest person to receive a union card in Boston. She was featured as a “kid wonder” in publications including People, Ebony, and Modern Drummer. After studying under a full scholarship at Berklee College of Music, she worked as an in- demand musician in NYC and later moved to LA where she was late night TV drummer for Arsenio Hall and Quincy Jones’ VIBE TV show. She has worked with artists including Herbie Hancock, Wayne Shorter, Al Jarreau, Stan Getz, Woody Shaw, Cassandra Wilson, Dianne Reeves, Esperanza Spalding, The Yellowjackets, and countless others. She is the first female artist to win a Grammy for Best Jazz Instrumental Album. She is a professor at Berklee College of Music, where she holds the position of Zildjian Chair in Performance, Berklee Global Jazz Institute. She is also the Artistic Director for the Beantown Jazz Festival and Berklee Summer Jazz Workshop. Her recent recordings include The Mosaic Project: Love and Soul, featuring a cast of female artists including Natalie Cole, Chaka Khan, Nancy Wilson, Lalah Hathaway, Lizz Wright, Ingrid Jensen, Linda Oh, Regina Carter, and others. She also released a tribute to Ornette Coleman with David Murray and Geri Allen. She tours with her band Social Science, featuring Aaron Parks and Matt Stevens.

About Darcy James Argue

Vancouver-born, Brooklyn-based composer and bandleader Darcy James Argue has toured nationally and internationally with his 18-piece ensemble, Secret Society. Argue made his mark with his critically acclaimed 2009 debut Infernal Machines. 2013 saw the release of Brooklyn Babylon, which, like Infernal Machines before it, earned the group nominations for both GRAMMY and JUNO Awards. His most recent recording, Real Enemies, released in the fall of 2016, earned a third consecutive GRAMMY nomination. Secret Society maintains a busy touring schedule, with European, Canadian, and South American tours and four appearances at the Newport Jazz Festival. Argue has also toured Australia and New Zealand leading the Jazzgroove Mothership Orchestra. He has led performances of his music by the WDR Big Band, the Danish Radio Big Band, the Frankfurt Radio Big Band, the Cologne Contemporary Jazz Orchestra, the Big Band Palácio das Artes, and the West Point Jazz Knights. Argue has composed works for chamber duo and string quartet, art songs for Newspeak, and created arrangements for the Atlanta Symphony. In 2015, Argue was awarded a Guggenheim Fellowship in Music Composition and a Doris Duke Artist Award. He has received commissions from the Fromm Music Foundation, the Jazz Gallery, the Manhattan New Music Project, the Jerome Foundation, and BAM, as well as ensembles including the Danish Radio Big Band, the Hard Rubber Orchestra, the West Point Jazz Knights, and the Orquestra Jazz de Matosinhos. He is the recipient of grants and fellowships from the New York Foundation for the Arts, New Music USA, the Aaron Copland Fund for Music, Composers Now, the Mid Atlantic Arts Foundation, the Canada Council for the Arts, and the MacDowell Colony.

About Rudresh Mahanthappa

Jazz at Princeton University under the direction of Rudresh Mahanthappa serves to promote this uniquely American music as a contemporary and relevant art form. Our goals are to convey the vast musical and social history of jazz, establish a strong theoretical and stylistic foundation with regard to improvisation and composition, and emphasize the development of individual expression and creativity. Offerings of this program include academic course work, performing ensembles, master classes, private study, and independent projects. They also have the opportunity to participate in academic courses from the music department curriculum that encourage the study of the historical, social, theoretical, stylistic, and creative issues that pertain to the jazz idiom.

Hailed by Pitchfork as “jaw-dropping... one of the finest saxophonists going,” alto saxophonist, composer and educator Rudresh Mahanthappa is widely known as one of the premier voices in jazz of the 21st century. He has over a dozen albums to his credit, including the acclaimed Bird Calls, which topped many critics’ best-of-year lists for 2015 and was hailed by PopMatters as “complex, rhythmically vital, free in spirit while still criss-crossed with mutating structures.” Rudresh has been named alto saxophonist of the year for seven of eight years running in DownBeat Magazine’s International Critics’ Polls (2011-2013, 2015- 2018), and for five consecutive years by the Jazz Journalists’ Association (2009-2013) and again in 2016. He won alto saxophonist of the year in the 2015-2017 JazzTimes Magazine Critics’ Polls and was named the Village Voice’s “Best Jazz Artist" in 2015. He has also received the Guggenheim Fellowship and the Doris Duke Performing Artist Award, among other honors, and is currently the Anthony H. P. Lee ’79 Director of Jazz at Princeton University.

Born in Trieste, Italy to Indian émigrés in 1971, Mahanthappa was brought up in Boulder, Colorado and gained proficiency playing everything from current pop to Dixieland. He went on to studies at North Texas, Berklee and DePaul University (as well as the Stanford Jazz Workshop) and came to settle in Chicago. Soon after moving to New York in 1997 he formed his own quartet featuring pianist Vijay Iyer. The band recorded an enduring sequence of albums, Black Water, Mother Tongue and Codebook, each highlighting Mahanthappa’s inventive methodologies and deeply personal approach to composition. He and Iyer also formed the duo Raw Materials.

Coming deeper into contact with the Carnatic music of his parents’ native southern India, Mahanthappa partnered in 2008 with fellow altoist Kadri Gopalnath and the Dakshina Ensemble for Kinsmen, garnering wide acclaim. Apti, the first outing by Mahanthappa’s Indo-Pak Coalition (with Pakistani-born Rez Abbasi on guitar and Dan Weiss on tabla), saw release the same year; Agrima followed nine years later and considerably expanded the trio’s sonic ambitions.

Mahanthappa has also worked with Jack DeJohnette, Mark Dresser, Danilo Pérez, Arturo O’Farrill’s Afro-Latin Jazz Orchestra, the collaborative trios MSG and Mauger, the co-led quintet Dual Identity with fellow altoist Steve Lehman, and another co-led quintet with fellow altoist and Chicago stalwart Bunky Green (Apex). His exploratory guitar- driven quartets on Samdhi and Gamak featured David Gilmore and Dave “Fuze” Fiuczynski, respectively. In 2015 he was commissioned by Ragamala Dance to create Song of the Jasmine for dancers and a hybrid jazz/South Indian ensemble. He was also commissioned by the PRISM Saxophone Quartet to compose a chamber piece, “I Will Not Apologize for My Tone Tonight,” which can be heard on the quartet’s 2015 double- disc release Heritage/Evolution, Volume 1.

Mahanthappa is a Yamaha artist and uses Vandoren reeds exclusively.

This story appears courtesy of Braithwaite & Katz Communications.
Copyright © 2018. All rights reserved.

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