192

Duke Ellington's Family Teams up with Grenada to Honor Bobby Short in Central Park Extravaganza

SOURCE:

Sign in to view read count
The series of events marking the 110th Anniversary of Duke Ellington continues: On Wednesday, July 1 at 6:30 p.m., The Duke Ellington Center for the Arts will host a spectacular and unprecedented event in Central Park featuring their Duke Ellington Big Band and 14 grand pianos on the Great Mall. Mercedes Ellington, granddaughter of the Duke and the shows producer, will pay personal tribute to Bobby Short, the famous pianistwho, 14 years ago on the same date, unveiled the Duke Ellington Statue at Fifth Avenue and 110th Street. The lead sponsor for the event is the island nation of GrenadaBobby Shorts favorite overseas destination.

The event will be a FREE public evening concert at the Central Park Bandshell featuring the 16-piece orchestra in the Bandshell and 14 grand pianos, courtesy of Beethoven Pianos, arranged in front of the Bandshell on the Great Mall. According to Edward Kennedy (Duke) Ellington II, grandson of the famous composer, Nothing like this has ever been done in Central Park beforeit will be a phenomenal spectacle!

The symbolism of 14 grand pianos at the event recognizes July 1 as the 14th anniversary since the unveiling of the Duke Ellington statue near the northeastern corner of Central Park. Bobby Short worked for almost 20 years at making that monument a reality. He personally raised some $1.5million for the project and did all the political and social maneuvering to have an amphitheater created and the statue erected in the middle of the important Fifth Avenue intersection at 110th Street. The Duke Ellington Memorial is considered to be the greatest physical expression in the world of the love a single musician can have for his favorite composer. It was the first monument in New York City dedicated to a person of color and the first memorial to The Duke in the United States.

Commenting on Shorts achievement, Mike Abbott, retired vice-president of MCA/Universal, a seasoned music industry veteran and life-long Harlem resident, says: If any New Yorker deserved to have a monument in the middle of a Fifth Avenue intersection, it was Duke Ellington; and if any New Yorker could pull it off, it was Bobby Short. And he did.

Bobby Short was a very private man, known for his constant presence at The Carlyleone of the most upscale hotels in New York City. He was the mainline attraction there, playing the piano for decades until he died in 2005. He loved to get away from it all and travel to Grenada, where he was able to relax and unwind undisturbed by his many fans and admirers. Although he treasured his privacy while vacationing, true to his nature, one of his favorite haunts while on the island was the Piano Bar at LaSource Resort, where he usually stayed. After dinner at the adjacent Great House Restaurant, Bobby would often give impromptu performancesmuch to the delight of fellow tourists and local patrons. Duke Ellington was the worlds most prolific composer during the twentieth century. This is true both in terms of the number of compositions and the variety of forms. That remarkable achievement is further underscored by more than fifty years of sustained performance as an artist and entertainer. He is considered by many, worldwide, to be Americas greatest composer, bandleader and recording artist. The Central Park concert on July 1 will feature Bobby Shorts favorite Ellington compositions18 of the more than 3,000 known Ellington creations.

The Duke Ellington Center for the Arts is a not-for-profit organization formed by Mercedes Ellingtonthe eldest of only four surviving descendants of Duke Ellington. The Center is coordinating the 110th Anniversary of Duke Ellington under the theme 110 Years Duke! and is collaborating with the People of Grenada on this particular event.

This story appears courtesy of All About Jazz Publicity.
Copyright © 2020. All rights reserved.

Visit Website

For interview requests or more information contact .

Tags

Jazz News

All About Jazz needs your support

Donate
All About Jazz & Jazz Near You were built to promote jazz music: both recorded and live events. We rely primarily on venues, festivals and musicians to promote their events through our platform. With club closures, shelter in place and an uncertain future, we've pivoted our platform to collect, promote and broadcast livestream concerts to support our jazz musician friends. This is a significant but neccesary effort that will help musicians now, and in the future. You can help offset the cost of this essential undertaking by making a donation today. In return, we'll deliver an ad-free experience (which includes hiding the bottom right video ad). Thank you.

Get more of a good thing

Our weekly newsletter highlights our top stories and includes your local jazz events calendar.