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Riverwalk Jazz Whenever You Want!

Published:
Jim Cullum Jr. By Mick Carlon

The only drawback to my all-time favorite radio show, Riverwalk Jazz, was that I had to wait until Saturday mornings to listen.

No longer!

Thanks to Stanford University’s Archive of Recorded Sound, twenty five years of this exalted show—over 350 radio shows, over 4,000 song performances—are now available twenty four hours a day, seven days a week on your computer.

Bookmark this address: riverwalkjazz.stanford.edu.

Presented on two channels, the music never stops. Allow me to quote from the superb website of these continually streaming shows: “Singular musical arrangements, created by band members, including leader Jim Cullum Jr.
Jim Cullum Jr.
Jim Cullum Jr.
b.1941
cornet
and pianist John Sheridan, enhance the classical forms of jazz the Band embraces. Co-host David Holt interviews guests and presents scene-setting narratives embedded with historical recordings and rare archival interviews.”

As I type, I’m listening to a fascinating show about the trumpet in jazz, including live recordings of Clark Terry
Clark Terry
Clark Terry
b.1920
trumpet
and Harry "Sweets" Edison
Harry
Harry "Sweets" Edison
1915 - 1999
trumpet
playing with the Jim Cullum Band. Wait a second. Now David Holt is introducing me to a Bobby Hackett
Bobby Hackett
Bobby Hackett
1915 - 1976
trumpet
recording from the early 1940s that I’ve never heard—and I thought I’d heard them all!

Currently the listener is not able to access the 350 shows at will. “Due to copyright restrictions, we are unable to provide a jukebox-style program where the user selects individual radio shows,” says the website. I find this no problem at all. With the Jim Cullum Band, you can’t go wrong. “It’s like a box of chocolates. Drop in and discover what’s on the air.”

Shows are organized, in groups of three, around a theme such as: Harlem Renaissance; New Orleans; Paris in the 30s; Birth of Swing; Blues Queens; Tunesmiths; Jazz and Civil Rights. Like I said, you can’t go wrong.

Over the past quarter century, the number of jazz greats who have appeared on the show is stunning: Howard Alden
Howard Alden
Howard Alden
b.1958
guitar
; Harry Allen
Harry Allen
Harry Allen
b.1966
saxophone
; Dan Barrett
Dan Barrett
Dan Barrett
b.1955
; Benny Carter
Benny Carter
Benny Carter
1907 - 2003
sax, alto
; Doc Cheatham
Doc Cheatham
Doc Cheatham
1905 - 1997
trumpet
; Kenny Davern
Kenny Davern
Kenny Davern
1935 - 2006
clarinet
; Harry "Sweets" Edison
Harry
Harry "Sweets" Edison
1915 - 1999
trumpet
; Bob Haggart
Bob Haggart
b.1914
; Lionel Hampton
Lionel Hampton
Lionel Hampton
1908 - 2002
vibraphone
; Milt Hinton
Milt Hinton
Milt Hinton
1910 - 2000
bass, acoustic
; Peanuts Hucko
Peanuts Hucko
Peanuts Hucko
1918 - 2003
clarinet
; Yank Lawson
Yank Lawson
b.1911
; Susannah McCorkle
Susannah McCorkle
Susannah McCorkle
1946 - 2001
vocalist
; New Black Eagle Jazz Band; Nicholas Payton
Nicholas Payton
Nicholas Payton
b.1973
trumpet
; Ken Peplowski
Ken Peplowski
Ken Peplowski
b.1959
clarinet
; Clark Terry
Clark Terry
Clark Terry
b.1920
trumpet
; Warren Vaché, and dozens of others. These artists are now available to play for you at the touch of a mouse.

The trumpet show over, I’m now listening to a show on the trombone in jazz. Jack Teagarden
Jack Teagarden
Jack Teagarden
1905 - 1964
trombone
is playing “Stars Fell on Alabama.” It’s beyond beautiful.

Remember, folks: riverwalkjazz.stanford.edu, Precious music and historical context, now available 24/7 for free.

Is this a great country or what?


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