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Take Five Recorded July 1, 1959

Published: 2012-01-08
Dave Brubeck It is a little difficult to reconcile the term “cool" with the music of the Dave Brubeck Quartet—so many of the labels attached to the music ultimately diminish its individuality. To be sure, the leader's forceful and polyrhythmic piano playing was never “cool," but the moniker does make a better fit for the group's alto saxophonist Paul Desmond.

Lester Young's influence was felt in virtually all corners of the jazz world in the 1940s and 50s. Players of all instruments and many jazz composers were strongly affected by his music. Desmond's conception came directly out of Young's and one his most profound disciples, saxophonist Lee Konitz.

Desmond was also a composer, and his Take Five, on the 1959 Dave Brubeck Quartet album “Time Out," astonished everyone at the time when it became a major hit.

It was written in the challenging time signature of 5/4 (albeit grouped into a regular subdivision of 3+2) and was recorded in 1959, when jazz had already been largely supplanted by rock and roll. If anything, it's a tribute to the tune's catchy melody and the off-handed elegance of the performance. Drummer Joe Morello is credited with having devised the basic rhythmic pattern and his drum solo is a classic of restraint and taste.

Drummers worldwide remember Joe as one of the greatest drummers we have known. His drum solo on “Take Five" is still being heard around the world.
Dave Brubeck

The quartet, with Brubeck on piano, Paul Desmond on alto saxophone, Eugene Wright on bass and Morello on drums, became successful beginning in the late 1950s exploring unusual time signatures. The album “Time Out," which included “Take Five" with Morello's memorable solo and “Blue Rondo á la Turk," became one of the most popular jazz albums ever.
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