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David Bromberg's 'Use Me' Taps Friends Dr. John, Levon Helm, Linda Ronstadt, John Hiatt, Los Lobos and More

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David Bromberg The masterful solo artist, bandleader, and former session man assembles dream team of Americana artists to “use him" as frontman on new and handpicked songs. Album due on Appleseed Records on July 12

LOS ANGELES, Calif.—When David Bromberg, one of America's finest roots musicians, emerged from a recording hiatus of 17 years with the solo, acoustic, traditional folk-blues album Try Me One More Time (Appleseed, 2007), fans and critics were thrilled, and the CD was rewarded with a Grammy nomination. For his follow-up album, Use Me, Bromberg chose a different approach: Why not ask some of his favorite singer-songwriters and musicians to write (or choose), produce, and perform on songs tailored to his versatile but distinctive skills as a guitarist and vocalist?

Answering David's call were well-known artists from the many genres comprising the amorphous “Americana" musical category. Representing contemporary rootsy singer- songwriters: John Hiatt, the first musician Bromberg approached, who penned the pensive “Ride On Out a Ways" for him; for New Orleans “fonk," Dr. John; there's three-guitar jam band interplay with Widespread Panic and jug band music with Levon Helm (the sprightly “Bring It With You When You Come," produced by Grammy-winning Larry Campbell). Linda Ronstadt puts in a rare appearance on a soulful Brook Benton ballad, Los Lobos contribute a Mexican-flavored waltz, Vince Gill and Tim O'Brien take care of the country and bluegrass quotient, Keb' Mo' brings the blues, and the hitmaking Butcher Brothers, producers Phil and Joe Nicolo (Bob Dylan, John Lennon, Cypress Hill, Nine Inch Nails), provide the languid R&B groove for the title song, a cover of Bill Withers' classic “Use Me."

The resultant album is due for July 12, 2011 release on Appleseed Records. A national tour will ensue.

Standout tracks change with each listening, but some of the high points include the crisp blues shuffle “Tongue," the album's lone Bromberg original, with Levon Helm on drums; “You Don't Wanna Make Me Mad," featuring David on slide guitar and Dr. John on piano; the ominous slow blues “Diggin' in the Deep Blue Sea," updated by Keb' Mo' and Gary Nicholson from Larry Davis' “Texas Flood" to address the dangers of offshore drilling, and the chipper Vince Gill—Guy Clark co-write “Lookout Mountain Girl," the only song on which David cedes most of the lead guitar duties to Vince (although he splits the lead with Widespread Panic's Jimmy Herring on “Old Neighborhood").

Rather than collating individual instrumental parts literally phoned in to a central location, the recording sessions for Use Me generally took place on each guest artist's home turf — in Woodstock (Levon Helm), New Orleans (Dr. John), Nashville (John Hiatt, Tim O'Brien, Vince Gill), Los Angeles (Los Lobos), and so on, to retain their regional flavors. For Bromberg, who started his professional career as an accompanist for everyone from Dion and Jay and the Americans to Bob Dylan and Willie Nelson, the sessions were simultaneously a throwback to his sideman days and a sidestep from his own recordings. “As artist and producer, I get to completely mold my vision of how the song should go," he explains. “The drawback is that I don't get many ideas that are not my own. It was fascinating for me to see the different approaches that everyone used in production."

No matter who the producers, songwriters or accompanying musicians are on Use Me, Bromberg's expressive guitar-playing and “rippling Fred Neil-like baritone that . . . brings warm, reassuring comfort" (Rolling Stone) remain the centerpiece of the CD, diamonds in golden settings.

Born in Philadelphia in 1945 and raised in Tarrytown, NY, “I listened to rock 'n' roll and whatever else was on the radio," says Bromberg. “I discovered Pete Seeger and The Weavers and, through them, Reverend Gary Davis. I then discovered Big Bill Broonzy, who led me to Muddy Waters and the Chicago blues. This was more or less the same time I discovered Flatt and Scruggs, which led to Bill Monroe and Doc Watson."

Bromberg began studying guitar when he was 13 and eventually enrolled in Columbia University as a musicology major. The call of the Greenwich Village folk scene in the mid- '60s drew David to the downtown clubs and coffeehouses, where he could watch and learn from the best performers, including primary sources such as his inspiration and teacher, the Reverend Gary Davis.

Bromberg's sensitive, blues-based approach to guitar-playing earned him jobs playing the Village “basket houses" for tips, the occasional paying gig, and lots of employment as a backing musician for Tom Paxton, Jerry Jeff Walker and Rosalie Sorrels, among others. He became a first-call, “hired gun" guitarist for recording sessions, playing on hundreds of records by artists including Bob Dylan (New Morning, Self Portrait, Dylan), Link Wray, The Eagles, Ringo Starr, Willie Nelson and Carly Simon. In the early '90s, David produced an as- yet-unreleased Dylan album, although two tracks have been issued as part of Dylan's “Bootleg Series."

An unexpected and wildly successful solo spot at the 1970 Isle of Wight Festival in Great Britain led to a solo deal with Columbia Records, for whom David recorded four albums. His eponymous 1971 debut included the mock-anguished “Suffer To Sing the Blues," a Bromberg original that became an FM radio staple, and “The Holdup," a songwriting collaboration with former Beatle George Harrison on which Harrison also played slide guitar. David, who had met the Grateful Dead's Jerry Garcia at the Woodstock Festival when they both took refuge from the rain in a tepee, wound up with four Dead members, including Garcia, playing on his next two albums.

Bromberg's range of material, based in the folk and blues idioms, continually expanded with each new album to encompass bluegrass, ragtime, country and ethnic music, and his touring band grew apace. By the mid-'70s, the David Bromberg Big Band included horn- players, a fiddler, and several multi-instrumentalists, including David himself. Among the best-known Bromberg Band graduates: mandolinist Andy Statman, later a major figure in the Klezmer music movement in America, and fiddler Jay Ungar (who wrote the memorable “Ashokan Farewell" for Ken Burns' PBS documentary, “The Civil War").

Despite jubilant, loose-limbed concerts and a string of acclaimed albums on the Fantasy label, Bromberg found himself exhausted by the logistics of the music business. “I decided to change the direction of my life," he explains. So David dissolved his band in 1980, and he and his artist/musician wife, Nancy Josephson, moved from Northern California to Chicago, where David attended the Kenneth Warren School of Violin Making. Though he still toured periodically, the recordings slowed to a trickle and then stopped.

After “too many Chicago winters," in 2002 David and Nancy moved to Wilmington, Del., where they currently serve as unofficial “artists in residence" and where David established David Bromberg Fine Violins, a retail store and repair shop for high quality instruments. Frequent participation in the city's weekly jam sessions helped rekindle Bromberg's desire to perform music “live" again, and the encouragement of fellow musicians Chris Hillman (The Byrds, Desert Rose Band, Flying Burrito Brothers) and bluegrass wizard Herb Pedersen helped nudge him back into the recording studio. The Wilmington jams also led to the formation of Angel Band, fronted by Nancy and two other female vocalists, with David frequently serving as an accompanist.

Bromberg's participation in his local and musical community has subsequently included a fund-raising music festival (Bromberg's Big Noise in the Neighborhood) to help renovate a local theater, and a keynote address at this past spring's Folk Alliance International convention, a non-profit organization of musicians, concert presenters and industry professionals.

David continues his musical revitalization with projects like Use Me, playing solo shows or backed by his own bluegrass quartet and reunions of the David Bromberg Big Band. Use your ears and catch him when you can!


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